Latest Tweets:

(Source: megmastery, via crzydemona)

barnacleboyofficial:

maljoylove:

indiscoverable:

stardustkr7:

justplainsomething:

morice:

songs that have an amazingly catchy and cool tune but really uncomfortable lyrics

image

I think we’re all thinking of the same thing but don’t dare speak its name for fear of summoning it.

The-song-that-must-not-be-named

We don’t talk about it

image

ARE THOSE BLURRED FUCKING LIMES

(Source: moraniarty, via orianrise)

littleprincesshowell:

you know that a book is going to be confusing as fuck when it starts with a map

(via orianrise)

(via orianrise)

judymartn:

American Horror Story: Murder House

 A Summary

(Source: judymartn, via regulargenius)

kissedmequiteinsane:

“It takes a very secure man to walk like that.”

#NOW STOP AND IMAGINE THIS IS ACTUALLY ALFRED #GLIDE WITH ME BRUCE; GLIDE

(Source: topderek, via orianrise)

arielmh:

"We are more than a bit concerned with the Benihana egg trick called for in the script. I’ve tried it and can only get it 1 out of 4 tries, and I’ve seen Benihana chefs flub the manoeuver when they have an entire grill as target. Mads has to crack his eggs into a 8-inch diameter skillet. The props Master calls his guy. The Production Manager calls in his guy. I call my guy. On the morning of the shoot we have 8 dozen eggs and 3 Japanese chefs with their hands made up to be hand doubles. I guess I don’t have to tell you that when Mads arrives on set, he just tosses an egg up in the air and the egg breaks on the spatula. No problem. Unbelievable. I insist it was a lucky fluke but he does it again. I accuse him of practicing when I wasn’t looking but he laughs (as if he has time to practise egg-cracking between scenes) and tells me he was a juggler in his youth.” [x]And here we all thought we’d have a million outtakes of Mads flubbing the egg trick…

arielmh:

"We are more than a bit concerned with the Benihana egg trick called for in the script. I’ve tried it and can only get it 1 out of 4 tries, and I’ve seen Benihana chefs flub the manoeuver when they have an entire grill as target. Mads has to crack his eggs into a 8-inch diameter skillet. The props Master calls his guy. The Production Manager calls in his guy. I call my guy. On the morning of the shoot we have 8 dozen eggs and 3 Japanese chefs with their hands made up to be hand doubles.

 I guess I don’t have to tell you that when Mads arrives on set, he just tosses an egg up in the air and the egg breaks on the spatula. No problem. Unbelievable. I insist it was a lucky fluke but he does it again. I accuse him of practicing when I wasn’t looking but he laughs (as if he has time to practise egg-cracking between scenes) and tells me he was a juggler in his youth.”
[x]

And here we all thought we’d have a million outtakes of Mads flubbing the egg trick…

(via regulargenius)

thebloggerknownasgeeknip:

sinterwoldiers:

Tony being a dork and entering every room just before Bucky does so he can loudly announce that winter is coming

He is a Stark, after all.

(via regulargenius)

flyawaymax:

porrim-some-sugar-on-me:

usbdongle:

significantmelancholy:

nevver:

Where you feel it

bringing this back because important 

#the cold crotch of contempt

"I hate that guy so much he makes my dick cold"

but what is spiderman so ashamed of

flyawaymax:

porrim-some-sugar-on-me:

usbdongle:

significantmelancholy:

nevver:

Where you feel it

bringing this back because important 

"I hate that guy so much he makes my dick cold"

but what is spiderman so ashamed of

(via anatomicalart)

ryanishka:

pas-de-chat-saute-de-chat:

still one of my favorite gifs holy shit

I guess you could say this is a…
pas de cheval

ryanishka:

pas-de-chat-saute-de-chat:

still one of my favorite gifs holy shit

I guess you could say this is a…
pas de cheval

(Source: rubiflax, via orianrise)

(Source: teenagerobotlove, via gargomons)

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an aprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

(via anatomicalart)

mymodernmet:

In this striking new series, New Zealand-based artist Henry Hargreaves worked with New York-based stylist Caitlin Levin to create gorgeous maps all made out of food. Originally inspired by a passion for travel, the two decided to take the food each country is best known for—spices for India, tomatoes for Italy, kiwi for New Zealand—and arrange them in a way that’s beautifully pleasant to the eye (and perhaps stomach).

(via staceythinx)